The platform Google Earth originally introduced the tool timelapse in 2013 offering everyone the chance to see how it has changed from a territory, through a series of satellite images captured over the years. Today the group of Mountain View announced that it has added new images to the database: Now you can go back until 1984.

The archive has been enriched with a huge amount of new data: petabytes of talking to you. More precisely, it comes to shots coming from the Landsat Global Archive Consolidation Program, to which are added those caught by two new satellites, Landsat 8 and Sentinel-2. This allows the service to take a step forward in terms of quality. In his speech on the official blog, bigg declares scoring 33 images of the entire planet one for each of the years covered by timelapse explored in a dynamic and interactive way through the system Time Machine Library developed by the CREATE Lab. Here’s an example.

The Meandering river in the Nyingchi area, Tibet

The animation above shows how it changed over the course of three decades, the stream of Meandering River in Tibet, while below you can see the reconstruction of ‘ Oakland Bay Bridge San Francisco.

 The reconstruction dell'Oakland Bay Bridge in San Francisco

The reconstruction dell’Oakland Bay Bridge in San Francisco

A tool of this type, as well as satisfy the curiosity of users around the world can have a use even in the context of the study and research. You look for example like Shirase Glacier in the Antarctic region has almost disappeared in a short time, to effect the testimony of climate change morphology and shape of our planet. For those interested, just click on the section Timelapse Google Earth .

        
        

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